Weather

Bomb cyclone covered US with snow and ice

The already ice-cold winter in the east and north of the US turned into an arctic nightmare when a so-called bomb cyclone raged across the area in early January.

© NASA

To date, 2018 is bitterly cold for many Americans.

On January 5, ice water poured into the streets from Boston harbor.

Elsewhere off the coast of Massachusetts, the Atlantic Ocean froze as far as the eye could see.

© Youtube

Local media even report that frozen sharks have been found at Cape Cod.

© Atlantic White Shark Conservatory

In New York, the windy temperature dropped to -29 ° C due to strong wind. And in the south, in the 'Sunshine State' Florida, snow fell for the first time in 28 years.

This is all because these areas - in an already harsh winter - were hit on January 4 by a so-called bomb cyclone, which entailed high wind speeds, precipitation and even lower temperatures.

Cyclone is created by rapid pressure reduction

Meteorologists use the term bomb cyclone if the atmospheric pressure in the heart of a cyclone drops by at least 24 millibars in 24 hours.

According to the American weather institute NOAA, the extreme pressure reduction is caused by hot air from the oceans colliding with cold air from the mainland.

When the pressure dips, air flows into the cyclone to fill the space between those two air masses. With extreme wind speed and heavy rainfall as a result.

If it is cold anyway, the precipitation of such a bomb cyclone usually falls in the form of large amounts of snow.

Cold from the North Pole

Although the bomb cyclone was quickly over, the temperature continued to fall for days.

Because the whirlwind extended over such a large area, cold polar air from the north invaded the US.

Video: Snowy 'bomb cyclone' hits Northeast: Dangerous n'oreaster brings cold, strong winds and snow (April 2020).

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