Animals

Biologists find 115 new species

An orange crocodile-like one and a mole with a weird muzzle - all kinds of new species popped up at the Mekong River in Asia. And most of them arrive on the list of most endangered species.

© Thomas Ziegler / WWF

A crocodile-like reptile with an orange head, a turtle that eats snails and a mole with a curious snout.

The animals are among the 115 new species that the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) has added to the list of life on earth in a recently published report.

All new species emerged in Southeast Asia in the area around the Mekong River, one of the regions on Earth with the greatest biodiversity.

The 115 new species include 88 plants, 11 frog-like species, 11 reptiles, three mammals and two fish.

The newcomers join the 2524 species found in this area since biologists began combing it out in 1997.

Animals threatened by mining

A number of new species are entering the list of endangered animals.

For example, biologists estimate that less than 200 of the crocodile species occur in the area, because the coal mines threaten their natural environment.

But some species thrive.

The mole with the weird muzzle is hardly in contact with people and their activities because he lives underground in protected areas and national parks.

The finds have been made for a number of years, and their status as a new species was preceded by a lengthy investigation.

The researchers hope that the report draws attention to the species richness on earth and creates support for cleaner exploitation of the Mekong River. After all, this benefits nature itself and the people who live around the river.

Video: Antarctica breakthrough: Scientists discover NEW species 'like nothing seen before' (April 2020).

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