AIDS

Researchers cure HIV

HIV and AIDS can possibly be cured within the foreseeable future. A German research team has removed the dreaded virus from infected mice.

Swallow a battery of medicines every day, face all kinds of side effects and be stigmatized by the environment. That has long been the daily reality for a large proportion of the 37 million HIV patients in the world.

But within a foreseeable number of years that may be a thing of the past. A German research team has achieved a sensational breakthrough.

The team has created an enzyme that could kill the incurable HIV virus to date.

Treatment cuts HIV

The enzyme acts as a kind of scissors that can cut the HIV virus out of the DNA of the infected person.

The enzyme tests and their conclusions have been published in Nature Biotechnology, and are considered a huge breakthrough in HIV and DNA research.

The so-called 'gene pair' has been given the name Brec1 and has already been successfully tested on mice.

After treatment with the enzyme, the sick mice showed no signs of contamination.

The researchers think that the treatment can also be successfully applied to people - and without side effects.

HIV treatment made by evolution

The enzyme is made by means of so-called targeted evolution - a technique that mimics the natural evolution of proteins, but where researchers can steer in which direction the evolution is going.

The German research team wants to start testing people as quickly as possible. This is likely to happen in Germany initially.

Video: Is a HIV Cure Possible? A Panel Discussion on HIV Cure Research (April 2020).

Popular Posts

Category AIDS, Next Article

Human flea brought plague to Europe
Diseases

Human flea brought plague to Europe

When the deadly plague prevailed in Europe in the mid-14th century, rats were not responsible for the spread. Until now, the common theory was that the plague bacterium Yersinia pestis was spread through the fleas of the black rat. However, this theory has been tested by researchers from the University of Oslo in Norway.
Read More
Multi-resistant bacteria: that's how dangerous they are
Diseases

Multi-resistant bacteria: that's how dangerous they are

Resistant bakterier er ifølge susdenssundhedsorganisation WHO et kæmpe problem for verdens sundhed. Bakterierne opbygger nemlig resistens for the tilgængelige antibiotika i takt med, at vi prøver at treatment dem. Derfor er der efterhånden mange forskellige resistant bakterier iblandt os - og the splits.
Read More
The Black Death unraveled
Diseases

The Black Death unraveled

The genetic material of one of the biggest killers ever, the plague bacterium Yersinia pestis, has now been mapped. The disease that she is transmitting, also known as 'the Black Death', has cost an estimated half of the European population in the 14th century in just five years. Johannes Krause of the University of Tübingen in Germany, together with British colleagues, searched for scraps of dried up blood and tissue in 46 teeth and 53 bones of four victims, who were buried in 1348 and 1349 in the East Smithfield cemetery in London.
Read More