Medicine

Poison sponges and cannibal cells destroy deadly bacteria

The bdellovibrio bacteriovorus invades other bacteria and eats them from within.

© Alfred Pasieka / Photolibrary / Getty Images

New types of antibiotics are being developed all over the world that are not resistant to resistant bacteria. These are the three most promising solutions.

1. Fight bacteria with bacteria

The bdellovibrio bacteriovorus invades other bacteria and eats them from within.

© Alfred Pasieka / Photolibrary / Getty Images

The US Army has discovered the cannibal bacterium bdellovibrio bacteriovorus. This bacterium invades other bacteria and eats them from within - also multi-resistant bacteria.

And it is virtually impossible to become resistant to this, because it requires more than one chance mutation.

2. Nanosponges absorb toxins

© Shutterstock

Scientists at the University of California San Diego have developed nanoparticles that can be injected into the bloodstream of patients. These particles are disguised as red blood cells and attract the toxins from bacteria.

They then absorb these toxins so that they can no longer cause damage to the body. But this medicine does not kill the bacteria, so they have no reason to become resistant.

3. Virus makes bacteria vulnerable again

Bacteriophages attach to the cell surface of the bacteria. They then inject them with their genetic material that replaces the bacterial DNA.

© Thierry Berrod / Mona Lisa Production / Science Photo Library

With the CRISPR gene technology, scientists can identify and eliminate the genes that cause resistance.

That is why they want to apply CRISPR to so-called bacteriophages - a certain type of virus that specializes in taking over bacterial cells.

This virus injects CRISPR into resistant bacteria, making them vulnerable to antibiotics.

Video: What Happens If You Don't Take out a Splinter? (April 2020).

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